Somos Un Pueblo Que Camina

Somos un pueblo que camina, y juntos caminando podremos alcanzar
Otra ciudad que no se acaba, sin penas ni tristezas, ciudad de eternidad.
Somos un pueblo que camina, que marcha por el mundo, buscando otra ciudad;
Somos errantes peregrinos en busca de un destino, destino de unidad
Siempre seremos caminantes, pues solo caminando podremos alcanzar
Otra ciudad que no se acaba, sin penas ni tristezas, ciudad de eternidad . . . 
Sufren los hombres mis hermanos, buscando entre las piedras la parte de su pan
Sufren los hombres oprimidos, los hombres que no tienen ni paz ni libertad
Sufren los hombres mis hermanos, más tu vienes con ellos y en ti alcanzarán
otra ciudad que no se acaba, sin penas ni tristezas, ciudad de eternidad . . .

ALTERNATE EXTRA VERSES (version 2)

Danos valor siempre constante, valor en las tristezas, valor en nuestro afán.
Danos la luz de tu Palabra, que guía nuestros pasos en este caminar.
Marcha, Señor, junto a nosotros, pues sólo en tu presencia podremos alcanzar
Otra ciudad que no se acaba, sin penas ni tristezas, ciudad de eternidad.

Dura se hace nuestra marcha, andando entre las sombras
De tanta oscuridad, todos los cuerpos desgastados
Ya sienten el cansancio de tanto caminar.
Pero tenemos la esperanza de que nuestras fatigas al fin alcanzarán,
Otra ciudad que no se acaba, sin penas ni tristeza, ciudad de eternidad.

I Guard the Flying Rear

Juaneco y su comboPERÚ

Now the Peruvians, in collected might,
With one wide stroke had wing’d the savage flight
But their bright Godhead, in his midday race,
With glooms unusual veil’d his radiant face,
Quench’d all his beams, tho cloudless, in affright,
As loth to view from heaven the finish’d fight.
A trembling twilight o’er the welkin moves,
Browns the dim void, and darkens deep the groves;
The waking stars, embolden’d at the sight,
Peep out and gem the anticipated night…
When pious Capac to the listening crowd
Raised high his wand and pour’d his voice aloud:
Ye chiefs and warriors of Peruvian race,
Some sore offence obscures my father’s face;
What moves the Numen to desert the plain,
Nor save his children, nor behold them slain?
Fly! speed your course, regain the guardian town,
Ere darkness shroud you in a deeper frown;
The faithful walls your squadrons shall defend,
While my sad steps the sacred dome ascend,
To learn the cause, and ward the woes we fear:
Haste, haste, my sons! I guard the flying rear…

excerpt from: The Columbiad, Book III  by Joel Barlow

Inca Eclipse

 

 

Quito Rears Her Fanes

The clime where Quito since hath rear’d her fanes,
And now no more her barbarous rites maintains.
He saw these vales in richer blooms array’d,
And tribes more numerous haunt the woodland shade…

Yet softer fires his daring views control,
And mixt emotions fill his changing soul.
Shall genius rare, that might the world improve,
Bend to the milder voice of careless love,
That bounds his glories, and forbids to part
From bowers that woo’d his fluctuating heart?
Or shall the toils imperial heroes claim
Fire his brave bosom with a patriot flame,Prisoners-of-Sun-inca-dream
Bid sceptres wait him on Peruvia’s shore,
And loved Oella meet his eyes no more?

Sudden his near approach the maid alarms;
He flew enraptured to her yielding arms,
And lost, dissolving in a softer flame,
His distant empire and the fire of fame.
At length, retiring thro the homeward field,
Their glowing souls to cooler converse yield;
O’er various scenes of blissful life they ran,
When thus the warrior to the maid began:
Long have we mark’d the inauspicious reignCapac round
That waits our sceptre in this rough domain;
A soil ungrateful and a wayward race,
Their game but scanty, and confined their space.
Where late my steps the southern war pursued,
The fertile plains grew boundless as I view’d;
More numerous nations trod the grassy wild,
And joyous nature more delightful smiled…

 

The Argument: Natives of America appear in vision.
Their manners and characters. Columbus demands the cause of the dissimilarity of men in different countries, Hesper replies, That the human body is composed of a due proportion of the elements suited to the place of its first formation; that these elements, differently proportioned, produce all the changes of health, sickness, growth and decay; and may likewise produce any other changes which occasion the diversity of men; that these elemental proportions are varied, not more by climate than temperature and other local circumstances; that the mind is likewise in a state of change, and will take its physical character from the body and from external objects: examples. Inquiry concerning the first peopling of America.

excerpts from: The Columbiad, Book II  by Joel Barlow

Princesas